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Making a Wildlife Pouch – Tutorial

This may not be the prettiest post I have ever written but I really hope it becomes one of my most important. Actually who am I kidding – with all the sweet little faces I have to share this will no doubt be one of the pretties AND cutest!

Right now as Australia heads into Summer we are already burning. Massive and devastating fires and wreaking havoc across the continent and while the human death toll will hopefully be minimal there is no doubt the impact it will have on our native wildlife will be monumental and horrifying. While the rest of the country waits and watches for this current batch of fires to be brought under control a large movement has started to arise to help the amazing wildlife carers who will take in and care for our most vulnerable animals over the current months. Many wish we could be there to help, most of us understand that thoughts and prayers will be the least helpful suggestion so groups are mobilising in an amazing way. I am always impressed at how some humans can just leap into action and help with little thought to  time and cost involved, if only more were like them.


While I was trying to work out my own way to get involved I stumbled across a brilliant Facebook group called the Animal Rescue Craft Guild who had immediately leapt into action and put out call out for wildlife pouches, koala mittens and bat wraps. The group started to grow exponentially with both inexperienced and experienced sewers offering their help in any way they could. I myself went looking for a pattern and, upon finding many written tutorials, realised the best way I could support was to offer printable templates and a simple tutorial for the wildlife pouches that any beginner could easily follow. The wonderful admins Joni and Avalon offered their experience to help me make sure the pouches would fit the needs of the carers and animals.

I have decided to put it up on the blog so it can reach more people who want to sew can. These pouches arent hard to make at all and it would be easy to knock a few off in an hour or so. I am sure that any little amount people can squeeze in will help.

Wildlife Pouch Tutorial

A huge thank you to Riley Blake Designs for providing me with the PERFECT flannelette for this project. It could not have been made in anything other than Joey by Deena Rutter.

Fabric Requirements:

Fabric Notes:

Liners should be 100% natural fibres – no polyester, synthetics or fabrics that have plastic or glitter. Breathability and softness are the priority. Flannelette, light cotton or jersey is recommended. NO WOOL PLEASE.

Outer pouches can be anything from light fabrics for summer to warmer fleeces and wool for winter. Fabric pouches rather than crochet/knit pouches are preferred.

Instructions:

Select and Print Templates

For ease of printing there are 3 separate PDFS attached to this pattern to account for different size pouches. Select your required size according to the template images and then follow the instructions below to print. You can download each template for printing below.

Templates for XXS – Medium Pouches

DOWNLOAD TEMPLATES FOR XX SMALL TO MEDIUM POUCHES HERE

Templates for Medium to Large Pouches

DOWNLOAD TEMPLATES FOR MEDIUM TO LARGE POUCHES HERE

Templates for Large to XX Large Pouches

DOWNLOAD TEMPLATES FOR LARGE TO XX LARGE POUCHES HERE

  • Open the selected PDF template and print, setting the print scale at 100% and making sure the box “Scale to Fit” isn’t checked. The 1” test square on Page 1 will help to ensure the printing has been done correctly.
  • Cutting the top and left side of each pattern page layout as per image above
  • Tape the pattern together lining up edges and the stocking shape (don’t forget to put tape on the back too).
  • Cut out pouch sizes required

 Cutting the Pieces:

Take your liner and outer fabric and fold in half lengthwise. Lay your template along the folded edge. Cut TWO of each shape.

Sewing your outer:

Place your outer pieces RST (right sides together) and pin. Using approximately a 1cm (1/2”) seam allowance, stitch around the outside of your shape. Use a shorter stitch length to ensure sturdiness of the seam and lock your stitches at the beginning and end of sewing. DO NOT STITCH ACROSS THE TOP OF YOUR POUCH. Trim your seams down.
Please note: When it comes to fabric for wildlife pouches your softest side is your right side. This may not be the printed side.

Fold the top of your pouch down approximately 2 ½ cm (1”). Press. Stitch 2-3 lines across the top to secure and provide some sturdiness.
Please note: You do not need to stitch the extra lines at this step if you dont want to but can instead fold over and then head to next step immediately.Fold over again. Press and stitch a line to secure.

Turn pouch right side out and iron so all seams are flat. Sew around the outside of your pouch again with enough of a seam allowance to completely enclose the raw edge on the inside. This is known as a French seam. Double check for pins and loose threads.
Sewing your liner:

Note: Make 2-3 liners for every outer so that washing and changing is easier for our amazing wildlife carers.

 Place your outer pieces WST (wrong sides together) and pin. Using approximately a 1cm (1/2”) seam allowance, stitch around the outside of your shape. Use a shorter stitch length to ensure sturdiness of the seam and lock your stitches at the beginning and end of sewing. DO NOT STITCH ACROSS THE TOP OF YOUR POUCH. Trim your seams down.
Please note: When it comes to fabric for wildlife pouches your softest side is your right side. This may not be the printed side.

Fold the top of your pouch down approximately 2 ½ cm (1”). Press. Stitch 2-3 lines across the top to secure and provide some sturdiness.
Please note: You do not need to stitch the extra lines at this step if you dont want to but can instead fold over and then head to next step immediately.
Fold over again. Press and stitch a line to secure

Turn pouch WRONG side out and iron so all seams are flat. Sew around the outside of your pouch again with enough of a seam allowance to completely enclose the raw edge on the inside. This is known as a French seam. Double check for pins and loose threads.

Place your liner inside your pouch and fold over. Congratulate yourself on a job well done!

So there you have it – one super simple tutorial that can have  you helping our amazing Wildlife Carers in no time at all. They are so easy to make that I am going to plan a sewing day with Hannah and some of her interested friends next week so they can also get involved. I am confident that at their ages, 10-11, they will be very successful with this project.

If you would like to download a PDF of this pattern for ease of use and for sharing within craft groups you can do so right here. For information on where to post and/or deliver the pouches follow The Rescue Collective on Facebook or join the group I mentioned above.

Don’t want to print templates? Avalon created a wonderful video showing an alternative method here.

I have taken my instructions from this PDF created by Joni. The legend that she is helped me to work it all into the tutorial.

Not just Wildlife Pouches are needed. Bat Wraps (honestly cutest things ever!), Koala mittens, knitted/crocheted blankets and nests are also in high demand. The Facebook group is full of wonderful tutorials to get you started.

One last super cute pic before I say good bye and head back to my sewing machine. Full disclosure that the photos shared in today’s post are not my own but found using a simple Google search.

Anyone else want to run out and foster Joeys? No? Just me ……?

Sarah xx

Fine print:

This tutorial has been created by Sarah Scott of Piccolo Studio and is intended for personal use only.  The pattern must not be reproduced, distributed or sold in part or whole in any form. Please Piccolo Studio as the original creator of the tutorial at time of sale and in any online promotion.  Piccolo Studio reserves the right to change or end this policy at any time.

A huge thank you to Riley Blake for providing me with the PERFECT flannelette for this project. It could not have been made in anything other than Joey by Deena Rutter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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